Dormant Groomer ..in Muskoka


Some time ago we talked tech stuff here… and it seemed OK..so while we are waiting for the cold…

Next time we will show you how we built a custom jack-shaft  tool to change out the Ski Doo QRS helix without removing the jack-shaft.

In order to stay in the technology and buddy loop, we picked up a 146″ srviper form Bracebridge Yamaha  

Suspension Coupling…

So to get to coupling this is what the skid does. (skid dynamics will be another article)   First…The rear spring and shock is called the rear, the front of the skid shock – spring is called the middle the skis shock spring is called the front

When the throttle is pinned…the force of the rotating tracks rotation pulls the skid violently forward.  This forward motion  has to go somewhere…so it then pushes done hard on the middle arm..pushing the front of the skid into the snow for launch.  The length and angle of the middle arm is designed on HP and application.  (more on that another time)  as this motion continues the back of the sled squats.   The strap and other geometry happens at that time as well.

So..with coupling..see the stop on the Yamaha picture…..once the back scissor hits that stop…it sucks up the front of the skid.   And then..that middle shock – spring begins immediately to work with the rear spring.  So..to better understand.     If you took out the middle shock and replaced it with a flat bar of steel..the skid would stop moving into compression the moment it hit the coupling block.

In other words the middle spring is designed to work with the rear spring on coupling.

Why do we need coupling..well coming off a turn ….you gas it without coupling the skis would lift and you may go straight..coupling simply keeps the skis somewhat on the snow by sucking up the front of the skid.     Most sleds today have deleted the front to rear coupling.   This was tried in snocross racing to stop “kick up” but I don’t think it is used anymore.

So why can’t we just shorten the strap to keep the skis down…Well you could ,,but then they would be dragging 100% of the time.  The clutch would not like that loss (more on that later) and fuel mileage would suffer as it would be revving higher.

I have an excel chart, somewhere,  that we made several years ago that graphs the skid motion on coupling every 10 mm thru its range.  But I can’t find it yet.

 

coupling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Groomer Operators… The Job


Tony Molica represented the MLSTA at the recent MSR groomer training program.   This is what he had to say.

With respect to the groomer operator course, I was trained on a number of groomer administrator issues such as payroll, signage, policies, health and safety, incident reports, etc.  I will be holding a meeting with the 5 MLSTA groomer operators next week to bring them up to speed.  This course is mandatory for the operators and a sign in sheet must be completed and submitted.  Procedures and note taking have never been more important with the groomer operators because of liability and ensuring due diligence.  Again, this goes back to safety and ensuring that risk is minimized on the trails.

I have not been as involved with other snowmobile clubs as I have with the MLSTA and district 7.  The effort that our volunteers make and the time they put into our sport is truly commendable.  We should all tip our helmets to these volunteers.

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Ontario Government Trails Act Fact Sheet


Steve Elliot and Tony Molica have worked feverously for several months dissecting this act.

Below is a condensed version written by Steve Elliot.

Ontario Government Trails Act Fact Sheet

Hot off the presses, your MLSTA team have been working hard to ensure maximum clarity for all on the new Trails Act. The following, although a long read, goes a long way to explaining the benefits, and helps to clear up some misconceptions around easements.

Here is my favorite section…

Q. Would landowners be forced to grant easements?
A. No, landowners would not be forced to grant easements for trail related purposes. Ontario Trails Act, 2016 easements would be voluntary.

Q. Does the Ontario Trails Act, 2016 have any impact on formal or informal agreements that trail organizations may already have with landowners?
A. No, formal or informal agreements between trail organizations and willing landowners can be used to negotiate access to land for trails or trail related activities. An OntarioTrails Act, 2016 easement provides another option that could be considered, if the landowner is willing.

And now for the rest…

Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport
Supporting Ontario’s Trails Act, 2016
September 19, 2016

Overview
Ontario has passed legislation to improve and sustain Ontario’s urban, suburban, rural and remote land and water trails.

The Supporting Ontario’s Trails Act, 2016 will help the trails community more effectively develop, operate and promote trails while enhancing the trails experience for all trail users.

Ontario is home to over 80,000 kilometres of trails that support recreation, tourism and transportation (including active transportation).
Each year, millions of Ontarians and visitors from outside the province experience the province’s world class trails system.
Trails encourage explorers of all ages and abilities to visit our unique communities and support local economies and jobs.
The province is committed to providing accessible opportunities for active living, recreation and tourism on Ontario’s trails for people of all abilities.
From 2009 through 2015, the province invested $130 million in both direct and indirect funding to support Ontario’s trails.
 The province is also investing more than $3.5 million in trails which will include adding more than 250 kilometres of trails through Ontario’s Pan American/Parapan American Games Promotion, Celebration and Legacy Strategy.
In 2014, hiking expenditures by Ontarians added $559 million to Ontario’s GDP and created more than 18,000 jobs across the province with an annual economic benefit of nearly $1.4 billion.

Questions and Answers
Q. What is the Supporting Ontario’s Trails Act, 2016?
A. On June 1, 2016, Ontario passed new legislation to improve and sustain thousands of kilometres of Ontario’s urban, suburban, rural and remote land and water trails while encouraging its expansion.
The Supporting Ontario’s Trails Act, 2016 will help the trails community more effectively develop, operate and promote trails while enhancing the trail experience for all trail users.
The act contains the following components:
 a stand-alone act entitled the Ontario Trails Act, 2016
 amendments to the Public Lands Act
 amendments to the Trespass to Property Act
 amendments to the Occupiers’ Liability Act
 amendments to the Motorized Snow Vehicles Act
 amendments to the Off-Road Vehicles Act

Q. Does the Supporting Ontario’s Trails Act, 2016 only affect hiking trails?
A. No, the Supporting Ontario’s Trails Act, 2016 affects all types of trails, including non-motorized, motorized, urban, suburban, rural, and remote land and water trails.

Q. Will this legislation be accompanied by any new funding for trails?
A. The Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport (MTCS) currently administers the Ontario Sport and Recreation Communities Fund and the Tourism Development Fund.
Together with the Ontario Trillium Foundation, an agency of MTCS, these funding programs can and do provide financial support for trail related projects.More information on these funding opportunities can be found through Grants Ontario: www.grants.gov.on.ca and through the Ontario Trillium Foundation: www.otf.ca.

Q. How would recognizing Ontario Trails of Distinction work?
A. The process for recognition would be developed in consultation with any appropriate persons or entities, such as provincial ministries, agencies, municipalities, stakeholders, Indigenous communities and others that have an interest in trails.

Q. How would a trail classification system be developed? What purpose would it serve? Would compliance with the classification system be mandatory?
A. A voluntary classification system would be developed in consultation with any appropriate persons or entities, such as provincial ministries, agencies, municipalities, stakeholders, Indigenous communities and others that have an interest in trails.
A trail classification system could be used to promote trails as it would provide useful information to visitors. It could include information such as type of trail use.
Better informed visitors could then select a suitable trail experience, which may reduce the likelihood of risk and injury and enhance their trail experience.
Compliance with a classification would be voluntary.

Q. How would best practices be developed? Would compliance with best practices be mandatory?
A. The types and content of voluntary best practices would be developed in consultation with any appropriate persons or entities, such as provincial ministries, agencies, municipalities, stakeholders, Indigenous communities and others that have an interest in trails.
Compliance with best practices would be voluntary.

Q. What is the current trail strategy? When will it be reviewed? How can we find out how its implementation is going?
In 2005, the Ontario Government released the Ontario Trails Strategy. The strategy was developed collaboratively with a wide range of stakeholders, as well as Indigenous communities. The strategy lays out a long-term plan for developing, managing, promoting and using trails across the province
In 2013, the government conducted province wide consultations on ways to strengthen the Ontario Trails Strategy, which led to the introduction of the Supporting Ontario’s Trails Act, 2016 and the development of a Trails Action Plan.
In December 2015, the government released a Trails Action Plan. The Trails Action Plan includes 31 discrete activities that support the continued implementation of the Ontario Trails Strategy.
The Ontario Trails Strategy will be reviewed when appropriate and an initial report on progress will be released within two years of the Ontario Trails Act, 2016 coming into force.

Q. How would targets be established? What is an example of a potential target?
A. Targets would be developed in consultation with any appropriate persons or entities, such as provincial ministries, agencies, municipalities, stakeholders, Indigenous communities and others that have an interest in trails.
Targets would be aspirational and could include items such as:
 number of Ontario trail users
 kilometers of trails mapped
 number of trails
 number of visitors taking part in a trail activity

Q. What is an easement? What is a covenant?
A. An easement is an interest in land where the landowner grants the easement holder a right of way over a piece of land. The Ontario Trails Act, 2016 will allow an owner of land to voluntarily grant an easement to an eligible body for various purposes relating to trails. An Ontario Trails Act, 2016 easement must be registered on title and binds subsequent owners of the land (i.e. a new owner is required to comply with the terms of the easement).
A covenant is a promise to do or not do something in relation to the land. The Ontario Trails Act, 2016 requires the easement to contain one or more covenants, agreed upon by the owner of land and the eligible body, stating the uses and activities permitted, restricted or prohibited on the affected land and describing those uses and activities.

Q. Easements granted under the Conservation Land Act are exempt from Planning Act approvals. Are Ontario Trails Act, 2016 easements also exempt from approvals under the Planning Act?
A. No, Ontario Trails Act, 2016 easements with a term of longer than 21 years require Planning Act approval.

Q. Why do Ontario Trails Act, 2016 easements require Planning Act approval when Conservation Lands Act easements do not?
A. The oversight of these easement mechanisms is different because Ontario Trails Act, 2016 easements do not require provincial ministry approval.
On the other hand, conservation easements must be approved by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. Subdivision control approvals under the Planning Act are the only applicable oversight mechanism for the establishment of Ontario Trails Act, 2016 easements.
Ontario Trails Act, 2016 easements may be associated with new development, which should be subject to a public review, whereas Conservation Land Act easements provide for the conservation and protection of natural landscapes and features (i.e. generally maintaining current conditions).
Planning Act approvals help to balance the interests of individual property owners with the wider interests and objectives of the whole community.

Q. What are the amendments to the Occupiers’ Liability Act?
A. The Occupiers’ Liability Act has been amended to:
 Clarify that the lower standard of care (responsibility) applies to occupiers of trail property which are not-for-profit or public sector organizations, even if there is an incidental fee related to access onto or use of the land, such as for parking; or if a public benefit or payment is given to a not-for-profit trail manager.
 Add portages to the list of lands to which the lower standard of care applies.

Q. What are the amendments to the Motorized Snow Vehicles Act and Off-Road Vehicles Act?
A. The amendments to the Motorized Snow Vehicles Act and Off-Road Vehicles Act are complementary and mirror the amended language in the Occupiers’ Liability Act.

Q. What are the amendments to the Public Lands Act?
A. The Public Lands Act has been amended to:
 Make damage to Crown land and property an offence (this offence provision will have no effect until a regulation to define damage is made and approved).
 Enable a court to order a person, who has been convicted of this offence, to stop the activity and/or rehabilitate lands and repair any damage to property.
 Provide the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry with new enforcement tools to stop vehicles, inspect documents, and arrest persons suspected or caught violating the act.
 Increase the maximum penalties for offenders and the length of time to initiate charges, specifically:
o There are different maximum penalties for individuals and corporations, and for subsequent offences. For individuals, the maximum penalties have increased from $10,000 to $15,000 for first offences and $25,000 for subsequent offences. For corporations, the maximum penalties have increased to $25,000 for first offences and $50,000 for subsequent offences.
o Courts can also impose an additional penalty equal to the amount of money gained by person(s) violating the Act.
o The limitation period has been increased (from two years from offence) to two years from discovery of the offence up to a maximum of five years from when the offence was committed.

Q. What are the amendments to the Trespass to Property Act?
A. The Trespass to Property Act has been amended to:
 Raise the maximum fine for trespassing from $2,000 to $10,000.
 Remove the limit on the amount of damages that could be recovered in a prosecution.

Sledarama


Don’t miss the sledarama show in Peterborough 8:30am till 4:00pm Sunday November 23rd

Tons of indoor and many used parts outdoor..come early lots to take in.

Please say “hi” to me Bob Hogg at the show..will be on stage at 1 PM as one of the race legends of Peterborough …. or..bunch of old guys hangin out..

Bob Hogg

Bob Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slederama

International Snowmobile Show


We would like EVERYONE  to enter as soon as you can..the club could use the money…  

   

ELECTROMARK

And the Toronto International Snowmobile, ATV & Powersports Show

Give More to ATV and Snowmobile Clubs this

October 24, 25, 26, 2014 at the International Centre                                     

                                                                                                                                                         

TORONTO, Ontario: Electromark and the 27th Annual Toronto International Snowmobile, ATV & Powersports Show have developed a wonderful opportunity for one lucky Snowmobile or ATV Club to win a $500.00 gift certificate to use for trail signage, provided by Electromark. http://osmmag.com/sign_contest/

 

Anyone can enter this draw to directly benefit their local Snowmobile or ATV Club right at the Show in the OSM and ATV World Magazines Booth located in Hall 2 West over the weekend of October 24th through 26th, or by entering online at one of the three following websites; www.torontosnowmobileatvshow.com or www.osmmag.com or www.atvworldmag.com.

Snowmobile and ATV enthusiasts are urged to enter their clubs in to this draw. The draw will take place on Thursday October 30th, 2014 in Willow Beach, Ontario at the OSM Head Office. The winning Club will be notified by Monday November 3rd, 2014.

“Any time we get the chance to help support local snowmobile and ATV clubs, we jump in with both feet, as we are true powersports enthusiasts and we appreciate the amazing support from Electromark. At of September 8, 2014, the Toronto International Snowmobile, ATV & Powersports Show, along with OSM and ATV World Magazines, have donated 7,000 square feet of exhibit space to Snowmobile and ATV Associations, Clubs, Districts and Federations at no charge, helping the grass roots of snowmobiling and ATV’ing grow. That’s over $80,000 of real estate we have donated back to our sport. We’re very proud of being a part of helping these groups reach out to the largest gathering of enthusiasts in one place at one time.” Richard Kehoe, President, Marketer Shows Inc.

 

The FUN of Snowmobiling and ATV’ing continues to grow at the most exciting Snowmobile and ATV Show in the World, the 27th Annual Toronto International Snowmobile, ATV & Powersport Show. 

For more information on exhibiting at the Toronto International Snowmobile, ATV & Powersports Show please call us at 1-888-661-SHOW (7469) or visit www.torontosnowmobileatvshow.com. For More information on Electromark visit www.electromark.com

 

WORLD’S LARGEST SNOWMOBILE AND ATV SHOW…ANYWHERE!

OCTOBER 24, 25, 26, 2014 – INTERNATIONAL CENTRE

 

 

 

Mobile Snowmobile Trail Apps


GPS AND MOBILE APPS

appleitunesl Android Robot outlined Blackberry
Mobile Apps: iSnowmobile Mobile Apps are cool apps that allow you to display the world’s largest snowmobile trail network on your Apple, Android, or Blackberry phone. Get instant access to Ontario’s world-class winter playground of over 32,000km of OFSC prescribed snowmobile trails.
GPS: In partnership with the OFSC, TrakMaps has launched Snowmobile Ontario 1 for Garmin and Lowrance GPS units. Snowmobile Ontario 1 offers snowmobile enthusiasts over 32,000km of province-wide interactive OFSC trail maps. Riders can easily and without worry, plan, venture and enjoy the ride, secure in knowing where they are and where they are going at all times.Snowmobile Ontario features over 19,000 POIs (points of interest) including OFSC clubhouses, hotels/motels, restaurants, gas stations, ATM’s and more.

OFSC Web Site Link


To purchase your GPS tracks, please select either Garmin or Lowrance:

UseTrailAtOwnRisk

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OFSF Trail Permits


Note from Lisa MSR

Hi everyone,

I’ve been doing some research to familiarize myself with the OFSC Districts and Clubs and in doing so have come across some ‘Buy Permits Online’ links that are not landing on the OFSC site for online permit sales but rather a ‘site invalid’ page.

Just as an fyi the URL it should link to is: https://permits.ofsc.on.ca/en

I’m sure many of you already know this and do apologize for sending this to all but thought it was worth mentioning as it has come up a few times in my research.

Thank you so much.

Lisa

It Is The Law

It Is The Law

 

 

 

 

 

 

UseTrailAtOwnRisk

 

Muskoka Snowmobile Trail Patrol


Trail Patrol

On behalf of Dustin Cleveland, D7’s new Trail Patrol Instructor.

He is looking at holding a meeting on Thursday January 2nd, 2014 starting at 7pm here at the District 7 office for those interested in becoming a Trail Patroller or instructors that require or would like a refresher. 

Please contact  MLSTA in the form below  before 3pm Friday December 20th,

The attendance response will determine if the meeting takes place or if we put it off for this season.

 

 

Chain Saw Course Oct 15


If anyone wants to do a Chain Saw course this winter please let me know and I will get your name in. As far as volunteer help for trail work this Saturday, I have only one volunteer so far. If we can not get enough help we will cancel the project.

Thanks,

Rene’

See page bottom for contact form.

Subject: Chainsaw Course

It was discussed at last night’s Board meeting the possibility of having another chainsaw course this fall.

Please advise if any of your members are interested, and, if so, the number of people per club.

Once I have all the numbers together then we will arrange a date and time for the chainsaw course.

Please let me know by Tuesday, October 15th, 2013.

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from everyone.

Hope everyone has a wonderful Thanksgiving.

Bobs adder..

My lazy man version of cutting small logs..well you actually have to run the saw..but we did not have a camera person near by.

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2012 09 17_0091